Crystalline 200

Will the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's Proposed Standards for Occupational Exposure to Respirable Crystalline Silica Reduce Workplace Risk?

March 26, 2015

By Susan E. Dudley & Andrew P. Morriss
This article finds that OSHA's proposed rule would contribute little in the way of new information, particularly since it is largely based on information that is at least a decade old—a significant deficiency, given the rapidly changing conditions observed over the last 45 years. The article concludes with recommendations for alternative approaches that would be more likely to generate information needed to improve worker health outcomes.

Side by side

The CPSC's Off-Road Adventure

March 23, 2015

By Joseph Cordes and Blake Taylor
This article raises issues with the Consumer Product Safety Commission's proposal to regulate recreational off-highway vehicles, commonly referred to as side by sides. CPSC issues rules to mitigate "unreasonable risks." In order to deem a risk as either reasonable or unreasonable, it is necessary to have information on the risk rate. The CPSC, however, proposed this rule without reliable information on the rates of injury and death associated with use of side by sides. Additionally, it is possible that the proposal rule, if enacted, would have a negative impact on consumer surplus if the safety standards make the products undesirable. Such a loss, however, is absent in the Commission's assessment of expected benefits and costs.

Susan Dudley with Kai Wegrich

Achieving Regulatory Policy Objectives: An Overview and Comparison of U.S. and EU Procedures

March 10, 2015

By Susan E. Dudley & Kai Wegrich
This paper aims to provide a descriptive analysis of procedural differences in regulatory development between the United States and the European Union to serve as a factual basis for understanding the regulatory challenges and opportunities for transatlantic trade. It summarizes regulatory procedures in each jurisdiction, dividing the process for establishing regulations into four stages: 1) agenda setting, 2) regulatory development, 3) final determination and opportunities for challenge, and 4) implementation and enforcement. After presenting the procedures in the U.S. and EU, the paper compares how the shared goals for achieving a regulatory system that is evidence based, transparent, and accountable are achieved in the two jurisdictions.