Public Comments

The GW Regulatory Studies Center scholars independently pursue high quality research to illuminate regulatory theory, policy, and practice; the Center does not take institutional positions on issues. To maintain its independence and the quality and integrity of its products, the GW Regulatory Studies Center does not accept funding that stipulates predetermined results or that limits dissemination of its scholarly activity or research. While the Center files public comments on specific regulations, it does so from the perspective of the public interest, and will not accept direct funding for individual comments.

Drone

Public Interest Comment on the Federal Aviation Administration's Proposed Rule: Operation and Certification of Small Unmanned Aircraft Systems

April 24, 2015

By Blake Taylor, Policy Analyst
The FAA suggests that this rule will be the first step in a long, complex path of integrating unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) into the National Airspace System. However, it will be a challenege for the Administration to ensure that this incremental approach occurs at a pace that closely mirrors market and technological changes. Because UAS are nascent technologies, the FAA has very little information on the potential benefits and risks. Retrospective review involving ambitious data collection is essential to structuring the future steps in the integration framework. In order for UAS to be truly integrated into the NAS, the FAA must commit now to ensure the rulemaking process going forward is more dynamic, and respectful of the societal gains innovation can bring.

Pregnant woman

Public Interest Comment on the Department of Labor's Proposed Rule: Discrimination on the Basis of Sex

April 16, 2015

By Lynn White, Esq.
In this proposed rule, the Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs (OFCCP) attempts to clarify the requirements that contractors must fulfill to ensure nondiscrimination on the basis of sex. The OFCCP understated the total costs of the proposed rule, limiting the regulatory analysis to rule familiarization and new costs associated with providing pregnancy accommodations to a limited number of contractor employees. However, actual costs could reach an estimated $130 million or more per year, according to the author's analysis.