Commentary Archive

Hiring

Why the Federal Government Struggles to Hire and Fire

April 29, 2015

By Lindsay M. Scherber, Research Assistant
In a series of investigative articles published earlier this year, Government Executive correspondents Kellie Lunney and Eric Katz explore the often discussed, but little understood, topic of federal human resources policy. Focusing on the federal government’s perplexing hiring and firing procedures, the authors shed light on the opaque web of barriers confronting government managers as they seek to recruit qualified candidates for job vacancies and fire underperforming employees who engage in misconduct or fail to meet their job requirements.

internet

Vague Net Neutrality Rule Impedes Innovation

April 21, 2015

By Gerald Brock, Co-director
The Federal Communication Commission's (FCC's) recent order imposing common carrier and net neutrality obligations on broadband Internet access providers creates a complex new regulatory structure. The rule creates a vague property right in the existing arrangements and creates an incentive to continue with the existing arrangements rather than to experiment with new ideas. Trying something new creates regulatory risk in addition to the normal market risk associated with innovation. In this way, net neutrality could reduce the incentive to innovate in favor of continuing approved practices from the past.

Ozone

Does Reducing Ozone Really Improve Human Health?

April 08, 2015

By Louis Anthony (Tony) Cox, Jr.
In revisiting the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for ozone, EPA recently concluded that current standards do not fully suffice to protect public health with an adequate margin of safety and that further reductions would probably further reduce mortalities and morbidities in the population. Central to this conclusion is EPA's determination that "O3 exposures are causally related to respiratory effects, and likely causally related to cardiovascular effects, and that long term O3 exposures are likely causally related to respiratory effects." Remarkably, this key conclusion is not supported by any reliable, objective statistical tests for potential causality. It rests solely on the subjective judgments of selected experts, applied to associational data that show that both ozone levels and adverse health effects are higher in some times and places than in others.

Disclosure

CFPB Should Consider a More Dynamic Approach to Prepaid Debit Card Regulation

April 01, 2015

By Blake Taylor, Policy Analyst
Last December, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau proposed rules intending to improve consumers’ understanding of their choices in the prepaid debit card market and to protect them from unreasonable fees. There is little to no evidence that the proposal will have desirable consequences related to either consumer or seller behavior. What is likely is that the rule will increased compliance burdens for sellers and limit consumer choice.