Testimony



Susan Dudley testimony

Accounting for the True Cost of Regulation: Exploring the Possibility of a Regulatory Budget

June 23, 2015

By Susan E. Dudley, Director
On June 23, RSC scholars Susan Dudley and Richard Pierce and President of the Canadian Treasury Board, Tony Clement, testified during a joint hearing before the U.S. Senate Committee on the Budget and Committee on Homeland Security and Government Affairs. Dudley testified in support of a regulatory budget and cited the potential for constructive debate on the real impacts of regulations, greater transparency, more efficient allocation of resources, and ultimately the potential for more cost-effective achievement of public priorities.

Professor Richard Pierce

Pierce: Accounting for the True Cost of Regulation: Exploring the Possibility of a Regulatory Budget

June 23, 2015

Richard J. Pierce, Jr., GW Lyle T. Alverson Professor of Law
On June 23, RSC scholar and GW Professor of Law Richard Pierce, RSC Director Susan Dudley, and President of the Canadian Treasury Board, Tony Clement, testified during a joint hearing before the U.S. Senate Committee on the Budget and Committee on Homeland Security and Government Affairs. Pierce testified in strong support of a regulatory budget but urged the dire importance of using benefit-cost analysis when considering any recommendations. He explains that there are two versions of a regulatory budget that would harm the nation.

Image of Susan Dudley testifying

Examining Practical Solutions to Improve the Federal Regulatory Process

June 03, 2015

Susan E. Dudley, Director
Though regulation affects every aspect of our lives, as a policy tool it rarely reaches the attention of voters (and consequently of elected officials) because, unlike the federal budget, its effects are often not visible. This testimony offers recommendations in four areas that may meet the Subcommittee's request for "common sense ideas that could garner bipartisan support and provide immediate improvement to the federal regulatory process." These are 1) codifying regulatory impact analysis requirements, 2) providing for earlier analysis and public input on new regulations, 3) increasing resources for regulatory oversight, and 4) being mindful of regulatory consequences when passing new legislation.