Publications

The GW Regulatory Studies Center scholars regularly conduct applied research to understand regulatory policy and practice from a public interest perspective. Our content often takes the form of public interest comments, formal testimony, working papers, policy insights, and short commentaries analyzing the most pressing issues in regulatory policy. View the rest of our material by the different types of publications listed on this page or our research areas.

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What We Publish

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Public Comments & Testimonies

Scholarly analysis of the potential effects of particular rulemakings from federal agencies, and advice to Congress on how to improve the rulemaking process.

 

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Commentaries & Insights

Short-form publications intended for all audiences which provide easy to access analysis of regulatory policy.

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Books & Reports

Formal publications, often completed with other leading organizations and individuals, providing a thorough understanding of regulations and the rulemaking process.

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Newsletters

The weekly Regulation Digest contains everything you need to know about regulatory policy today, and our monthly Center Update gives you all of the latest from our team.

 

For accessible charts and supporting data that you can use in your own publications or presentations, visit the Reg Stats page.

 


Latest Publications 

From Fragility to Agility: The Future of Regulation

The National Academy of Public Administration offers an agile regulatory framework to enhance government responsiveness to current and future challenges. The report includes tenets and practices that can improve public management and regulatory outcomes.

The Durability of Governance Reform

The notice and comment process, in which government organizations make public draft laws and regulations and solicit feedback on these proposals, is a prominent governance reform in contemporary China.

Return of the National Nanny

When activists took charge of FTC rulemaking in the 1970s, the agency barely survived the debacle.

Back to the Future: How Not to Write a Regulation

The new activists at the FTC are again seeking radical transformation of long-standing legal foundations of antitrust and consumer protection, to be implemented through a new wave of rulemaking.

The Unintended Consequences of Banking Regulations: Shadow Banking

Shadow banks are not subject to the stringent regulation that traditional banks are and can pose great risks to the financial system. Since the financial crisis, banking regulations have been tightened to reduce the fragility of the financial system.

FDA Struggles to Pinpoint Impacts of Proposed Rule

In February, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) released a long-awaited proposed rule creating national standards for companies in the prescription drug supply chain.

FDA & Wholesale Drug Distributors

Dylan Desjardins offers ways for the FDA to improve the underlying assumptions, examination of alternatives, and review of unintended consequences for this proposed rule.

Final Report on Contractors in Rulemaking

This report sheds light on the ways that federal agencies use contractors to support the rulemaking process.

In the Shadow of China

In recent years, the Chinese government has increasingly flexed its economic, political, and military muscles around the world. Close to its mainland home has been no exception, as the Chinese government has taken actions to pressure officials in Hong Kong and Taiwan.

Possibilities and Perils of Deepfake Technology

While the potential for deepfake technology to disrupt society has been clear for years, its growing accessibility and high-profile instances of use have increased concerns over their capabilities. In the first of a planned series discussing deepfake regulation, this post summarizes some of the most significant costs and benefits of the technology.